Tag Archives: expression

The Nature of Limiting Beliefs

Our conversations with Alana have spanned almost two decades.

We thought it might be fun to share some of our dialogues with Alana when we were first learning how to communicate fluently with Alana who is not an entity but the “frequency” of all of our hearts.

This is a timeless conversation Kirk shared with Alana back in the year 1997. He is curious about the nature of beliefs and how to assist people when limiting or negative beliefs are holding them back from creating their heart’s desires.

Insights for Changing Limiting Beliefs

Kirk VandenBerghe: Alana, can you provide some insight on how to assist people in changing beliefs that no longer serve them?

Alana: Teach your clients a concept of belief as a doorway.

Once a person can hold the picture of a door in their mind and sense the door as you would a belief, they will be able to open it and see what is inside the basis of their beliefs.

If they are slow to grasp the concept, then teach or help them realize they have the key to this door which acts as a symbol for unlocking and perceiving the belief they are holding. Mysteriously, when they are ready enough to open the door, the door will dissolve or open and provide insight.

The Power of Belief

Kirk: Some beliefs people have formed hold them back, while others help them grow and learn. Can you say more about this?

Alana: There are many different approaches to assist a person in belief realization. Some beliefs are hard to examine, hard to grasp the roots that lead them to be. A person may feel they hold hurtful thoughts. Let’s discuss the nature of beliefs to better understand the intention they hold.

Know all beliefs are essentially purposeful. They ignite emotions and emotional responses that allow people to learn themselves and about others.

When a person holds a belief that keeps them locked within themselves—what you term as limiting—they are creating a path to develop understanding of why others share the same beliefs they do. Usefulness is present because this creates a co-creative type of understanding. We are not judging if the belief is expanding or limiting, just that it creates connection.

Having understanding requires opening to a level of consciousness that has the intent to develop compassion. Without understanding and compassion, we would not recognize our connection. When a belief is imprinted internally then it can change and take a new form.

When a belief is resisted it will mirror back again and again and again. This is why the patterns within the universe of a belief that has rippled through the consciousness of each individual soul who has expressed and then accepted it
through forgiveness can choose to alter (elevate) to a new experience. A belief can collectively transform humanity. A belief offers an individual or humanity as a whole to gain experience and learn into possibility.

Belief Systems Expand Consciousness

Kirk: So you are saying we have our personal beliefs then we have cultural and even global beliefs we all share?

Alana: Yes! And beliefs catch on, and become morphic fields that hold information. Emotional responses are a beautiful fuel that is charged by beliefs.

An emotion is a beautiful expression. When fear charges a belief—which stems from a fear of separation—it affects the chakra alignment of the individual and reduces or inhibits the flow of love.

Fear does have its purpose. It keeps those bonded in belief, and when as a whole we can create that bond without fear as the connector then we will inherit the ability to expand our consciousness to attain more knowledge of our inherit mostly, untapped nature. This will help us collectively, raise our belief system as a whole to new heights.

Belief and Compassion

Kirk: Then on a more vast scale beliefs can be tools of our consciousness that propel us to learn and elevate our awareness.

Alana: Indeed, Kirk. So this is why we can not judge a person for holding a limiting belief, because it is what helps us create doorways. In personal development work, ask each individual to use the key that you offer them to find and eventually the the doorway will unlock and dissolve, and lack will be the first to go.

If you traced all belief that is limiting, or hurtful—such as that of victim—or grounded in not enough . . . that of pain, that of fear . . . I can go on and on. If you traced these fear-based beliefs back to their initial beginning they will connect to a belief in lack, and fear to express due to preconceived projected consequences. Compassion allows us to move beyond identifying with a belief as who we are, but rather a doorway we have created for the purpose of learning.

All emotional feelings are valid. Feeling that resonates within are there for a reason. The reason for the feeling or emotion is not to be judged, just expressed safely and it can transform because as a species we learn. This is why logic is not really our dominate state. It assists, but when it judges it keeps us from allowing our beliefs to continue expanding to embrace greater possibility. Logic is just an aid that is based on our minds ability to compare and reason.

Healing Visions: A Film by Annie Gusman Joly

The following film and transcription follows the artistic expression of Annie Gusman Joly.

Annie describes her creative path and how starting in 1986when she attended classes at the Esalen Institutehow her relationship to painting deepened and opened a door to healing.

Perhaps her journey may provide inspiration for others to move beyond fear and channel their energy into a path of healing no matter what chosen medium to fuel a space for healing.

Annie Gusman Joly’s film, Healing Visions, is about how the act of painting has helped her heal emotional wounds.

Annie Gusman Joly’s Healing Visions

Painting of a Face by Annie Gusman JolyI started painting for myself in 1986.

I took a workshop at Esalen Institute, and when I arrived I had no what I was going to paint. I had been an illustrator over 10 years, and I was just feeling the need to paint for myself to do something different. I thought maybe I would paint the scenery. I was painting in a beautiful building on a cliff overlooking the Pacific Ocean, and I stood there with a giant white piece of paper and my hand just started to move. And I was totally amazed at what came out.

And the more I painted, the more came out. Even though the paintings were very dark as far as imagery, it was a great release to do them. It was discovering a whole new part of myself that I did not know had existed. When I look at the paintings now, it seems that I had some kind of awareness, some kind of precognition, because that year my mother committed suicide.

Using Intuition

People are afraid to paint because they don’t know where to start. Seeing that piece of white paper is very scary, but it is also very exciting at the same time.

I don’t think too much about what I am going to paint, I just try to go on intuition. Sometimes I just put a color down, and that color has a certain feeling which will make me want to put another color next to it.

After my mother’s suicide I felt like I was leading a double life: the internal life and the external life. It made me feel very separate from other people. As you can imagine it was a very, very dark and very difficult time for me. But I knew that I had to do something. I started to paint again, because I remembered how comforting the paintings had been to me when I painted at Esalen.

Healing Through Painting

Painting by Annie Gusman JolyIn one of my favorite paintings called “My Healer,” I realized that my healing was up to me. The paintings became a practice, like meditation . . . like dance . . . like poetry.

It’s very important to suspend judgment at the painting. I still occasionally look at something and say, like, “Oh, I don’t like that color. I think I’ll move this.” But now I think of it more as it’s only a part of painting that I don’t like, and I know that’s going to happen.

And maybe it’s just the tension in the painting that helps me move on, that helps me finish the painting. And I really try not to judge it as though I would if I went to museum.

It’s about those early paintings . . . there is a lot of demons flying around. And the demons are really scary at that point, I am really afraid. They look mean. They look angry, because that’s really how I am feeling inside.

As the months progressed, the demons became my friends. For example, after her death, I had an incredible dream. The dream was very scary at the time, but when I actually started to work on the piece, the whole mood, the whole character, of the painting changed into one of benevolence and compassion, and kindness and healing.

Listen to the Paintings Speak

In the early nineties, I met a man named Shaun McNiff. He taught me that it’s really not a good idea to talk about paintings, and that so many of us judge paintings according to somebody’s criteria. He taught me: don’t judge the painting. Don’t talk about the painting. It’s just as if the painting has a soul and a being of it’s own. So when I look at the paintings, what I do is pretend that they are actually a person.

For example, you wouldn’t talk about a friend who came into the room and said, “Wow, that dress looks really bad with those shoes,” you know, or, “That hat is really the wrong color.”

What I like to do is have the paintings speak to me.

Most of the time, I stand when I paint. I feel like if my whole body is involved rather than my hand and my brain, things seem to flow better.

When you paint with no judgment, things happen that you don’t expect. And it’s a journey. It’s like going on a trip to a foreign country, a place like you had never been before.

It’s almost like a door. It’s really not the grief any more; the grief is turned into a door. Where I know that these images will come . . . I just know that.

Speaking Truth

Annie Gusman JolyI think it’s easier to speak your truth when you are not doing something for money. These paintings were created for me; they came from a flow that was inside. So I feel free . . . I feel free to create what I want to create without worrying about the end result.

When I first started doing these paintings, I was little nervous to show them to people, because I thought they would think I was really strange, kind of crazy. Slowly, but surely, when I started to share them with some people, it was really amazing to hear their reaction. I think everybody relates to them in some manner in their own life. Everybody’s had loss, everybody’s had some problems.

I never feel like I run out of things to paint. I have an endless well of imagery that I feel now can come out at anytime. I never felt like this before I started these paintings.

When I’m in a room full of my paintings, I feel that I am with my best friends. It’s like something else is at work and things are not as they appear, and that there is another force going on within us. And that if we just can connect with . . . I don’t know, just makes me smile.